2019 minimum wage chart

January 25th, 2019 by Shenna Harris, Jill Kirila and Meghan Hill at Squire Patton Boggs


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Squire Patton Boggs, the author of our Wages and Hours – An Employer's Guide, put together a minimum wage chart for pretty much everywhere and anywhere. The chart, along with lots of other good stuff, can be found in the book, which in turn can be found in this drop-down menu, which in turn can be used to pre-order the book.

Jurisdiction

Minimum Wage[1],[2]

Comments

Alabama

No provision.

 

Alaska

$9.89

Indexed to inflation or $1 more than the federal minimum wage, whichever is higher.

Arizona

$11.00

Increasing to $12.00 on and after January 1, 2020.  Thereafter adjusts annually based on a cost of living formula.

  • Flagstaff

$12.00

Increasing to $13.00 on January 1, 2020; $15.00 or $2.00 over state minimum wage, whichever is greater, on and after January 1, 2021; $15.50 or $2.00 over state minimum wage, whichever is greater, on and after January 1, 2022. Thereafter adjusted annually on January 1 based upon cost of living. Applies to employees working at least 25 hours per year in the city. 

Arkansas

$9.25

Increasing to $10.00 on January 1, 2020 and $11.00 on January 1, 2021.

California

$11.00 (1-25 employees)

 

$12.00 (25+ employees)

For employers of 1-25 employees, increasing to $12.00 on January 1, 2020, $13.00 on January 1, 2021, $14.00 on January 1, 2022 and $15.00 on January 1, 2023. Additional yearly increases to be determined by August 1 of each year.

For employers of 25 or more employees, increasing to $13.00 on January 1, 2020, $14.00 on January 1, 2021 and $15.00 on January 1, 2022. Additional yearly increases to be determined by August 1 of each year.

  • Alameda

 

$13.50 beginning on July 1, 2019; increasing to $15.00 on July 1, 2020.  Yearly cost of living increases beginning on July 1, 2022 and thereafter. 

  • Belmont

$13.50

Only applies to employers subject to the Belmont Business License Tax or who maintain a facility in Belmont, and to employees who perform at least two hours of work per week in Belmont.

  • Berkeley

$15.00

Indexed to CPI beginning July 1, 2019 and thereafter.

  • Cupertino

$15.00

Increased annually each January for cost of living.

  • El Cerrito

$15.00

Indexed to CPI beginning January 1, 2020 and thereafter.

  • Emeryville

$15.00*

Increasing to $16.00 on July 1, 2019.  Thereafter indexed to the local CPI. 

*Higher for businesses with 56 or more employees working within the city of Emeryville.

  • Los Altos

$15.00

Increased annually each January for cost of living.

  • Los Angeles

(city and county; county follows large employer scheduled rate)

$13.25 (26+ employees)

 

For employers of 26 or more employees, increasing to $14.25 on July 1, 2019, and $15.00 on July 1, 2020. 

For employers of 25 or fewer employees, minimum wage of $12.00, increasing to $13.25 on July 1, 2019, $14.25 on July 1, 2020, and $15.00 on July 1, 2021. 

On July 1, 2022 and annually thereafter, minimum wage will increase based on the CPI for the LA metro area. 

NOTE: Non-profits may qualify for deferred schedule.

  • Malibu

$13.25 (26+ employees)

For employers of 26 or more employees, minimum wage of $13.25, increasing to $14.25 on July 1, 2019, and $15.00 on July 1, 2020. 

For employers of 25 or fewer employees, minimum wage of $12.00, increasing to $13.25 on July 1, 2019, $14.25 on July 1, 2020, and $15.00 on July 1, 2021. 

On July 1, 2022 and annually thereafter, minimum wage will increase based on the CPI.

  • Milpitas

$13.50

Increasing to $15.00 on July 1, 2019.  Thereafter will be increased annually on July 1, 2020 based upon CPI.

  • Mountain View

$15.65

Increases annually each January based upon CPI.

  • Oakland

$13.80

Adjusted annually for inflation. Applies to any person who performs at least two hours of work within the city in a particular week and is entitled to the state minimum wage.

  • Palo Alto

$15.00

Adjusted annually each January based upon CPI. Applies to employees who work two hours per week within Palo Alto. 

  • Pasadena

$13.25 (26+ employees)

For employers of 26 or more employees, minimum wage of $13.25. 

For employers of 25 or fewer employees, minimum wage of $12.00. 

Additional increases will be considered beginning in February 2019. 

  • Redwood City

$13.50

Increasing to $15.00 plus an additional amount based upon CPI on January 1, 2020.  Thereafter increases annually based upon CPI. Applies to employers that maintain a business facility in Redwood City or are subject to Redwood City’s business license requirements; covers employees working two hours or more in a calendar week within Redwood City. 

  • Richmond

$15.00

Does not apply to any small business employer who pays for less than 800 hours of employee labor during a given two-week period, including all persons performing work for compensation on a full-time, part-time, or temporary basis. An employer that pays for 800 or more hours of employee labor during any 2-week period at all business locations, whether inside or outside the City of Richmond, shall be deemed to be a covered employer for the entirety of that 2-week period and the remainder of that calendar year quarter. In determining how many hours of employee labor an employer pays for, all labor performed by businesses with substantial overlapping ownership or control shall be aggregated. Lower rate allowed if employer provides medical benefits.  Adjusted for inflation beginning January 1, 2020.

  • San Diego

$12.00

Adjusted for inflation each January 1. 

  • San Francisco

$15.00

Adjusted annually each July for inflation.  Applies to any person who performs at least two hours of work within the city in a particular week and is entitled to the state minimum wage.

  • San Jose

$15.00

Adjusted annually each January for cost of living.  Applies to any person who performs at least two hours of work within the city in a particular week and is entitled to the state minimum wage.

  • San Leandro

$13.00

Increasing to $14.00 on July 1, 2019, and $15.00 on July 1, 2020. 

  • San Mateo

$15.00

Adjusted each January based upon CPI.  Applies to employers who are subject to the City of San Mateo Business License Tax or who maintain a facility in the City of San Mateo.  Different rates for nonprofits.

  • Santa Clara

$15.00

Annually increases each January according to the prior year’s Consumer Price Index (CPI). Applies to employees who perform at least two  hours or more per week of work in Santa Clara.

  • Santa Monica

$13.25 (26+ employees)

Large employers—those with 26 or more employees in Santa Monica: Increasing to $14.25 on July 1, 2019, and $15.00 on July 1, 2020. 

Small employers—those with 25 or fewer employees in Santa Monica: Minimum wage of $12.00, increasing to $13.25 on July 1, 2019, $14.25 on July 1, 2020, and $15.00 on July 1, 2021.

Beginning July 1, 2022, and each year thereafter, the minimum wage will increase based on Consumer Price Index (CPI).

Applies to employees who perform at least two hours or more per week of work in Santa Monica.

  • Sunnyvale

$15.65

Increases each January 1 indexed to CPI. Applies to employers who are subject to the Sunnyvale Business License Tax or who maintain a facility in Sunnyvale; applies to employees who perform at least two hour of work per week in Sunnyvale.

Colorado

$11.10[3]

Increasing to $12.00 on January 1, 2020.  Thereafter adjusted annually based upon CPI.  Adjusts annually based on a cost of living formula.

Connecticut

$10.10

Automatically increases to 0.5% above the rate set in the FLSA if the federal minimum wage equals or becomes higher than the state minimum.

Delaware

$8.75

Increasing to $9.25 on October 1, 2019, $9.75 on October 1, 2020, and $10.25 on October 1, 2021.  Adopts the federal minimum wage rate by reference if the federal rate is greater than the state rate.

District of Columbia

$13.25

Increasing to $14.00 on July 1, 2019, $15.00 on July 1, 2020. Annual indexing effective July 1, 202.1If rate is set below federal rate, rate is adjusted to equal the federal rate plus $1.

Florida

$8.46

Adjusted annually based on a cost of living formula.

  • Miami Beach[4]

$11.31

Increasing to $12.31 on January 1, 2020 and $13.31 on January 1, 2021.

Georgia

$5.15

Excludes from coverage any employment subject to FLSA when federal minimum wage is greater that the state rate.

Guam

$8.25

 

Hawaii

$10.10

Excludes from coverage any employment subject to FLSA when federal minimum wage is greater that the state rate.

Idaho

$7.25

 

Illinois

$8.25

 

  • Chicago

 

$12.00

Increasing to $13.00 on July 1, 2019.  Applies to all employees who perform at least two hours of work within the city within a two-week period. Must provide notice of current minimum wage with first paycheck including the minimum wage. 

  • Cook County

$11.00

Increasing to $12.00 on July 1, 2019, $13.00 on July 1, 2020.  Thereafter increased annually in accordance with CPI. Applies to all employees who perform at least two hours of work within the county within a two-week period.

Indiana

$7.25

 

Iowa

$7.25

Adopts the federal minimum wage rate by reference if the federal rate is greater than the state rate.

Kansas

$7.25

Excludes from coverage any employment subject to FLSA when state rate is higher than federal rate.

Kentucky

$7.25

Adopts the federal minimum wage rate by reference if the federal rate is greater than the state rate.

Louisiana

No provision.

 

Maine

$11.00

Increasing to $12.00 on January 1, 2020.  Beginning January 1, 2021 and thereafter, increases annually based upon the CPI.  Adopts the federal minimum wage rate by reference if the federal rate is greater than the state rate, except any such increase is limited to no more than $1 per hour above the current legislated state rate.

  • Portland

$10.90

Increases every July 1 based upon the CPI.

Maryland

$10.10

Adopts the federal minimum wage rate by reference if federal rate is greater than state rate.

  • Montgomery County

$12.00*

$12.00 for 50 employees or less; if 51 or more employees, rate is $12.25. Increasing to $12.50 (1-50 employees) and $13.00 (51+ employees) on July 1, 2019; $13.00 (1-10 employees), $13.25 (11-50 employees) and $14.00 (51+ employees on July 1, 2020; $13.50 (1-10 employees), $14.00 (11-50 employees) and $15.00 (51+ employees on July 1, 2021; $14.00 (1-10 employees) and $14.50 (11-50 employees) on July 1, 2022; $14.50 (1-10 employees) and $15.00 (11-50 employees) on July 1, 2023; and $15.00 (1-10 employees) on July 1, 2024.  Increases designed so that $15.00 rate for all employers will be phased in by July 1, 2024.

  • Prince George’s County

$11.50

Applies to all work done by employees in this county.

Massachusetts

$12.00

Increasing to $12.75 on January 1, 2020, $13.50 on January 1, 2021, $14.25 on January 1, 2022, and $15.00 on January 1, 2023. 

Michigan

$10.00

Increasing to $10.65 on January 1, 2020, $11.35 on January 1, 2021, and $12.00 on January 1, 2022. Annual adjustments for inflation beginning each January 1.

Minnesota

$9.86

Rate applies to large employers. (Small employer (annual receipts of less than $500,000) $8.04). 

  • Minneapolis

$11.25 (101+ employees)

For small employers (1-100 employees), $10.25, increasing to $11.00 on July 1, 2019, $11.75 on July 1, 2020, $12.50 on July 1, 2021, $13.50 on July 1, 2022, $14.50 on July 1, 2023 and $15.00 on July 1, 2024.

For large employers (101+ employees), increasing to $12.25 on July 1, 2019, $13.25 on July 1, 2020, $14.25 on July 1, 2022, and $15.00 on July 1, 2023.  Must display poster

Mississippi

No provision.

 

Missouri

$8.60

Increasing to $9.45 on January  1, 2020, $10.30 on January 1, 2021, $11.15 on January 1, 2022 and $12.00 on January 1, 2023. 

Montana

$8.50

Adjusts annually on January 1st based on a cost of living formula. Rate is $4 for businesses with a gross annual sales of $110,000 or less.

Nebraska

$9.00

 

Nevada

$8.25

$7.25 if employer provides health benefits. Subject to increase based on CPI each July.

New Hampshire

$7.25

Adopts the federal minimum wage rate by reference if the federal rate is greater than the state rate.

New Jersey

$8.85

Adjusts annually on January 1st based on cost of living formula. 

New Mexico

$7.50

 

 

  • Albuquerque

 

$9.20

Applies to all employers who are required to have a business license or business registration from Albuquerque; those employers must pay the minimum wage to employees who work within the city for at least two hours per week. $8.20 rate if the employer provides certain healthcare and/or childcare benefits to the employee .

  • Bernalillo County

$9.05

Applies to all employers who are required to have a business license or business registration from the county; those employers must pay the minimum wage to employees who work within the county for at least two hours per week. $8.05 rate if the employer provides certain healthcare and/or childcare benefits to the employee .

  • Santa Fe

$11.40

Applies to all employers who are required to have a business license or business registration from the city of Santa Fe and nonprofit organizations; those employers must pay the minimum wage to employees for all hours worked within Santa Fe that month. May increase in March annually for cost of living.

  • Santa Fe County

$11.40

Applies to all employers who are required to have a business license or business registration from the county of Santa Fe. May increase in March annually for cost of living.

  • Las Cruces

$10.10

 

New York

$13.50 (1-10 employees in NYC)

 

$15.00 (11+ employees in NYC)

 

$12.00 (Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester county)

 

$11.10 (outside of NYC, Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties)

For small employers (1-10 employees) in New York City, increasing to $15.00 on December 31, 2019. 

For employers in Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties, increasing to $13.00 on December 31, 2019, $14.00 on December 31, 2020, and $15.00 on December 31, 2021. 

For employers in the remainder of state, increasing to $11.80 on December 31, 2019 and $12.50 on December 31, 2020.

Thereafter indexed to inflation. 

NOTE: Rates are different for workers in the fast food industry and tipped workers.

North Carolina

$7.25

 

North Dakota

$7.25

 

Ohio

$8.55

Subject to automatic adjustment each January 1st based on Constitutional amendment. $7.25 for employers grossing $314,000 or less.

Oklahoma

$7.25

Adopts the federal minimum wage rate. Employers with gross annual sales of less than $100,000 and fewer than 10 employees, rate of $2. Excludes from coverage any employment subject to FLSA. 

Oregon

$10.75*

*Standard minimum wage rate (see below for other rates), increasing to $11.25 on July 1, 2019, $12.00 on July 1, 2020, $12.75 on July 1, 2021, $13.50 on July 1, 2022 and indexed to CPI thereafter. 

$12.00 for employers in the Portland Metropolitan area, increasing to $12.50 on July 1, 2019, $13.25 on July 1, 2020, $14.00 on July 1, 2021, $14.75 on July 1, 2022 and $1.25 over the standard minimum wage beginning July 1, 2023 and thereafter. 

$10.50 for employers in certain non-urban counties, increasing to $11.00 on July 1, 2019, $11.50 on July 1, 2020, $12.00 on July 1, 2021, $12.50 on July 1, 2022 and $1 less than the standard minimum wage beginning July 1, 2023 and thereafter. 

For employees that do not work at a fixed site, the employer can either track and pay the applicable hours and rate of each region where the employee works, or choose to pay the highest rate applicable for all hours worked. For details on each region see here: http://www.oregon.gov/boli/WHD/OMW/Pages/Minimum-Wage-Rate-Summary.aspx

Pennsylvania

$7.25

 

Puerto Rico

$7.25

The federal minimum wage automatically applies to businesses and employees covered under the FLSA. The minimum wage for employees who are not covered under the FLSA is equal to at least 70 percent of the current minimum wage or the applicable mandatory decree rate, whichever is higher; currently $5.08.  The Secretary of Labor and Human Resources in Puerto Rico is authorized to reduce the percentage for any employer who can show that the 70% rate would substantially curtail employment in that business. Excludes from coverage any employment subject to FLSA.

Rhode Island

$10.50

 

South Carolina

No provision.

 

South Dakota

$9.10

Indexed to inflation.

Tennessee

No provision.

 

Texas

$7.25

Excludes from coverage any employment subject to FLSA. Adopts the federal minimum wage rate.

Utah

$7.25

Excludes from coverage any employment subject to FLSA. Adopts the federal minimum wage rate.

Vermont

$10.78

Annual increases each January 1.  Adopts the federal minimum wage rate by reference if the federal rate is greater than the state rate.

Virgin Islands

$10.50

 

Virginia

$7.25

Excludes from coverage any employment subject to FLSA. Adopts the federal minimum wage rate.

Washington

$12.00

Increasing to $13.50 on January 1, 2020. Beginning January 1, 2021, adjusts annually on January 1 based upon percentage increase of the Consumer Price Index. 

  • Seattle

501+ employees: $16.00

 

1-499 employees: $15.00 (can meet using health benefits)

Employers of 501+ employees, rate is regardless of provision of medical benefits.  Employers of 1-499 employees can meet the $15.00 rate requirement by paying no less than $12.00 per hour in wages and contributing at least $3.00 per hour toward an employee’s health benefits and/or reported tips. Increases annually for inflation.

  • SeaTac

$16.09

Applies only to employees in the hospitality and transportation industry, see SeaTac Municipal Code Section 7.45.

  • Tacoma

$12.35

Annually adjusted by the rate of inflation. 

West Virginia

$8.75

 

Wisconsin

$7.25

 

Wyoming

$5.15

 

 

 

[1] This chart does not include minimum wage rates that are specific to tipped employees, minors, hotel, casino and/or transportation workers, local government contractors or employees or any other category of specialized workers.

 

  Rates shown are rates in effect as of January 1, 2019.  [2]Chart is current as of December 3, 2018.

[3] Rate applies only to retail and service, commercial support service, food and beverage, and health and medical industries. 

[4] Miami Beach’s minimum wage ordinance conflicts with and is likely preempted by Florida state law.



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