FMLA - "leave" as in "leave the employee alone"

Authored by hrsimple
June 12th, 2018

FMLA contains "leave", as in "the employee isn't at work" but also as in "leave the employee alone or else". See what the boundaries are to avoid the "or else" from one of our authors @Ogletree Deakins.



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